Posted by & filed under Ductworks Press Release.

Local Air Duct Cleaning Company in Denver Post

In the January 27th, 2010 Colorado Business Section, the Denver Post wrote:

Ductworks Inc. of Denver is collaborating with National Jewish Health to provide a comprehensive approach to controlling symptoms for people who suffer from allergies and asthma. Ductworks and National Jewish Health are marketing and distributing the Family Air Care Indoor Allergens and Mold Test Kit.

SOURCE:  Denver Post

For more information on Ductworks and the Family Air Care Kit, go to www.ductworks.com.

Posted by & filed under Air Duct Cleaning.

The EPA offers consumers advice about when to get their air ducts clean, how to choose a provider, and qualities to avoid in providers. The EPA does not certify air duct cleaners, so the consumer is responsible for conducting their own research.

What is Air Duct Cleaning?

Duct cleaning generally refers to the cleaning of various heating and cooling system components of forced air systems, including the supply and return air ducts and registers, grilles and diffusers, heat exchangers heating and cooling coils, condensate drain pans (drip pans), fan motor and fan housing, and the air handling unit housing.

How do Air Ducts Become Dirty?

If not properly installed, maintained, and operated, HVAC components may become contaminated with particles of dust, pollen or other debris. If moisture is present, the potential for microbiological growth (e.g., mold) is increased and spores from such growth may be released into the home’s living space. Some of these contaminants may cause allergic reactions or other symptoms in people if they are exposed to them.

What to expect from an Air Duct Cleaning Service Provider

If you decide to have your heating and cooling system cleaned, it important to make sure the service provider agrees to clean all components of the system and is qualified to do so.

  • Open access ports or doors to allow the entire system to be cleaned and inspected.
  • Inspect the system before cleaning to be sure that there are no asbestos-containing materials (e.g., insulation, register boots, etc.) in the heating and cooling system. Asbestos-containing materials require specialized procedures and should not be disturbed or removed except by specially trained and equipped contractors.
  • Use vacuum equipment that exhausts particles outside of the home or use only high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) vacuuming equipment if the vacuum exhausts inside the home.
  • Protect carpet and household furnishings during cleaning.
  • Use well-controlled brushing of duct surfaces in conjunction with contact vacuum cleaning to dislodge dust and other particles.
  • Use only soft-bristled brushes for fiberglass duct board and sheet metal ducts internally lined with fiberglass. (Although flex duct can also be cleaned using soft-bristled brushes, it can be more economical to simply replace accessible flex duct.)
  • Take care to protect the duct work, including sealing and re-insulating any access holes the service provider may have made or used so they are airtight.
  • Follow NADCA’s standards for air duct cleaning and NAIMA’s recommended practice for ducts containing fiber glass lining or constructed of fiber glass duct board.
The EPA offers consumers advice about when to get their air ducts clean, how to choose a provider, and qualities to avoid in providers. The EPA does not certify air duct cleaners, so the consumer is responsible for conducting their own research.

What is Air Duct Cleaning?

Duct cleaning generally refers to the cleaning of various heating and cooling system components of forced air systems, including the supply and return air ducts and registers, grilles and diffusers, heat exchangers heating and cooling coils, condensate drain pans (drip pans), fan motor and fan housing, and the air handling unit housing.

How do Air Ducts Become Dirty?

If not properly installed, maintained, and operated, HVAC components may become contaminated with particles of dust, pollen or other debris. If moisture is present, the potential for microbiological growth (e.g., mold) is increased and spores from such growth may be released into the home’s living space. Some of these contaminants may cause allergic reactions or other symptoms in people if they are exposed to them.

What to expect from an Air Duct Cleaning Service Provider

If you decide to have your heating and cooling system cleaned, it important to make sure the service provider agrees to clean all components of the system and is qualified to do so.

Open access ports or doors to allow the entire system to be cleaned and inspected.

Inspect the system before cleaning to be sure that there are no asbestos-containing materials (e.g., insulation, register boots, etc.) in the heating and cooling system. Asbestos-containing materials require specialized procedures and should not be disturbed or removed except by specially trained and equipped contractors.

Use vacuum equipment that exhausts particles outside of the home or use only high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) vacuuming equipment if the vacuum exhausts inside the home.

Protect carpet and household furnishings during cleaning.

Use well-controlled brushing of duct surfaces in conjunction with contact vacuum cleaning to dislodge dust and other particles.

Use only soft-bristled brushes for fiberglass duct board and sheet metal ducts internally lined with fiberglass. (Although flex duct can also be cleaned using soft-bristled brushes, it can be more economical to simply replace accessible flex duct.)

Take care to protect the duct work, including sealing and re-insulating any access holes the service provider may have made or used so they are airtight.

Follow NADCA’s standards for air duct cleaning and NAIMA’s recommended practice for ducts containing fiber glass lining or constructed of fiber glass duct board.

Posted by & filed under Understanding Ventilation Systems.

Air conditioning units require regular maintenance to keep them working at an optimal level. Follow these guidelines to ensure your air conditioner is working efficiently.

Conduct Regular Maintenance

Hire a professional HVAC person to regularly inspect your air conditioning system.  Make any necessary repairs in a timely manner. The longer you put off repairs, the more expensive they can become.

A typical air conditioner service will:

  • Check for proper refrigerant (freon) levels.
  • Check all electrical components and controls.
  • Clean evaporator and condenser coils.
  • Oil motors as needed.
  • Calibrate thermostat.
  • Check filters.

Change Filters

Routinely check and replace filters. Use the highest rated filter recommended by the manufacturer and make sure to install it properly.  There should be no gaps or leaks around the edge of the filter.

Use a Good Thermostat

Control indoor air temperature with a good thermostat. A good thermostat can operate air conditioner to a lower setting saving energy while you are at work, or while sleeping.

Keep Air Ducts Clean

Have your air duct cleaned every three to five years.  Excessive build up of dust and debris in air ducts can cause blocked or limited airflow, reducing the effectiveness of the air conditioner.

Posted by & filed under Air Duct Cleaning, Understanding Ventilation Systems.

You may have heard about having your air ducts cleaned, but how do you know if you need to? Here are a few tips to help you decide if the time is right for you to clean you air ducts.

Ask Your HVAC Maintenance Technician

The next time you have your heating or air conditioning unit maintained, ask the technicians opinion about your air duct cleaning needs. Since they are not trying to sell you their cleaning services you will likely get an honest answer.

Inspect Your Air Ducts

Inspecting the condition of the air ducts is relatively simple.  The best place to inspect the condition of the air ducts is at the trunk line.  The trunk line is the large rectangular air duct attached to the furnace, extending overhead across the basement area.  Locate a vent register on the trunk line, and remove it with a screw driver.  Look inside the trunk line with a flashlight and mirror, or take a snapshot with a digital camera.  The trunk line is the central part of the heating and cooing system and will be the best indicator of the systems cleanliness.

Posted by & filed under Allergies & Asthma, Ductworks Press Release, Mold.

Family Air Care Indoor Allergens & Mold Test Kit

Ductworks, Inc., is collaborating with National Jewish Health to provide a comprehensive approach to controlling symptoms for people who suffer from allergies and asthma. National Jewish has developed a diagnostic kit to assess the allergen levels in indoor environments.

Ductworks and National Jewish Health are working together on marketing and distribution of the Family Air Care® Indoor Allergens and Mold Test Kit. The kit, developed and serviced by National Jewish Health in Denver, determines levels of common indoor allergens and mold from dust samples taken inside a home, apartment or other building. The kit is now available through Ductworks for $299.

Once the diagnostic assessment of the home is complete, users can go to the Family Air Care® Website to learn how to lower allergen levels in their homes.

“The Family Air Care® kit is the only commercially available indoor-air testing kit that lets customers compare their results with samples from homes around the nation, and offers specific advice about how to interpret the results and what to do after receiving them,” said David Tinkelman, MD, Vice President of Health Initiatives at National Jewish Health.

To use the Family Air Care® Indoor Allergens and Mold Test Kit, consumers simply attach a small capture device to their vacuum-cleaner hose, briefly run the vacuum cleaner in their homes, then mail the collection device to National Jewish Health in a pre-paid envelope provided with the kit. Test results are reported in a secure e-mail. The kits can be ordered online at www.Ductworks.com.

“The Family Air Care®assessment benefits all households, but is especially important to the 70 percent of households where a person with allergies and/or asthma lives,” said Dr. Tinkelman. “The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommend that people with allergies and/or asthma reduce levels of allergens and irritants in their homes to improve their health.”

About National Jewish Health

National Jewish Health is known worldwide for treatment of patients with respiratory, immune and related disorders, and for groundbreaking medical research. Founded in 1899 as a nonprofit hospital, National Jewish Health provides the best integrated and innovative care for patients and their families.

For 12 consecutive years, U.S. News & World Report has ranked National Jewish Health the No. 1 respiratory hospital in the nation. Scholarly publisher Thomson Scientific has ranked National Jewish among the 25 most influential research institutions in the world in its areas of focus. Further information can be found by visiting www.nationaljewish.org.

About Ductworks

Ductworks, Inc. “Your Air Duct Cleaning Expert” is a Denver-based company founded in 1990 to improve indoor air quality for homes and businesses. Their patented system of scraping and vacuuming is the most effective process for air duct cleaning. They have more technicians certified by the NADCA than any company in Colorado and provide customers with before and after photos to insure top quality performance. For more information on Ductworks and the Family Air Care Kit, go to www.ductworks.com.

Posted by & filed under Air Duct Cleaning.

The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) was formed in 1989 as a non-profit association of companies engaged in the cleaning of HVAC systems. Its mission was to promote source removal as the only acceptable method of cleaning and to establish industry standards for the association.

Air Duct Cleaning Standards

Since the EPA does not certify air duct cleaners, consumers are glad to know that the NADCA exists to provide comprehensive information to both consumers and providers. NADCA currently holds the highest standards of service and only certifies those providers with the knowledge to perform professional air duct cleaning.

Air Duct Cleaning Certifications

NADCA also provides the following certifications:

  • ASCS Certification: Air System Cleaning Specialists
  • CVI Certification: Certified Ventilation Inspectors
  • VSMR Certification: Ventilation System Mold Remediators

Air Duct Cleaning Checklists

NADCA also provides consumers and providers with checklists to ensure quality of service.  All members are required to perform work in accordance with NADCA Standards. As part of its Quality Assurance Program, NADCA provides information about how to select a qualified contractor along with pre – and post-cleaning checklists to ensure that total system cleaning is performed.  Reviewing the checklist is an excellent way to ensure quality of the air duct cleaning.

Posted by & filed under Mold.


Mold occur naturally, and most common types of fungi are not hazardous to healthy individuals.  However, people with allergies, asthma or weakened immune systems are more likely to react to mold.  Listed below are 10 things you should know about mold according to the EPA.

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60% ) to decrease mold growth by: venting bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside; using air conditioners and de-humidifiers; increasing ventilation; and using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing, and cleaning.
  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

Source: EPA

Posted by & filed under Air Duct Cleaning.

Cleaning your air ducts is not part of regular air conditioning and heating maintenance. The cost can vary greatly depending on the size of the unit, accessibility, and overall level of dirt.

Air Duct Cleaning Cost

The Environmental Protection Agency says that “duct cleaning services typically – but not always – range in cost from $450 to $1000 per heating and cooling system, depending on the services offered, the size of the system to be cleaned, system accessibility, climactic region, and level of contamination” and type of duct material.

Before agreeing to hire a company to clean your ducts, do some homework. Talk to at least 3 companies and ask for cost and time estimates from each.  Check references, and find out if they have had complaints logged with the Better Business Bureau. Be sure you understand the specific work covered by each company’s quote, ask questions and choose the company that offers the most knowledgeable answers.

Beware of “Blow & Go” Companies

Beware of “blow-and-go” air duct cleaning companies. Blow and go companies often charge a nominal fee and do a poor job of cleaning the heating and cooling system. These companies may also persuade the consumer into unneeded services with and/or without their permission.  When making purchasing decisions, we typically look at price rather than at cost. Both are important, but paying the lowest price often ends up costing us more.  Understand that an air duct cleaning that is not properly performed will make the dust in the home worse.

Cleaning your air ducts is not part of regular air conditioning and heating maintenance. The cost can vary greatly depending on the size of the unit, accessibility, and overall level of dirt.

Air Duct Cleaning Cost

The Environmental Protection Agency says that “duct cleaning services typically – but not always – range in cost from $450 to $1000 per heating and cooling system, depending on the services offered, the size of the system to be cleaned, system accessibility, climactic region, and level of contamination” and type of duct material.

Before agreeing to hire a company to clean your ducts, do some homework. Talk to at least 3 companies and ask for cost and time estimates from each.Check references, and find out if they have had complaints logged with the Better Business Bureau. Be sure you understand the specific work covered by each company’s quote, ask questions and choose the company that offers the most knowledgeable answers.

Beware of “Blow & Go” Companies

Beware of “blow-and-go” air duct cleaning companies. Blow and go companies often charge a nominal fee and do a poor job of cleaning the heating and cooling system. These companies may also persuade the consumer into unneeded services with and/or without their permission.When making purchasing decisions, we typically look at price rather than at cost. Both are important, but paying the lowest price often ends up costing us more.Understand that an air duct cleaning that is not properly performed will make the dust in the home worse.

Posted by & filed under Air Duct Cleaning.

Hiring a qualified air duct cleaner is important because a poor job can actually make indoor air quality worse.  If you are concerned with healthy indoor air, make sure to ask potential air ducts cleaners the following questions.

How Long Have You Been In This Business?

Experience is important in performing a quality job. Ask the number of years that the company has been in business.  Ask the number and types of air duct cleaning jobs that the company has performed to get a feel for their experience level.

Do You Specialize In Air Duct Cleaning?

Ask the company if they specialize in air duct cleaning, or if it is one of several services that they perform.  Companies that specialize in a service are really good at one thing… rather than being mediocre at several things.

Is The Company NADCA Certified?

The National Air Duct Cleaners Association is the group the EPA recommends to find qualified air duct cleaning contractors.. The NADCA is an excellent resource for consumers because it provides a list of qualified service providers, tips on how to choose a provider, and a checklist to ensure a good job was done. If possible, hire a company that is a certified member of NADCA.

Are The Employees Screened?

Ask if the employees have been screened by a thorough background check.  A background check will ensure that the employee does not have criminal convictions.

Ask For Referrals

Ask for referrals or testimonies. Find out if the technicians did a good job, if they had any complaints, if their home was respected, and if the technicians cleaned up after themselves.  The air duct cleaning contractor should be able to point you to several current sources of referrals or testimonies.

Posted by & filed under Duct Cleaning Videos, Ductworks Press Release.

Local Duct Cleaning Company Featured On DIY Show

ARVADA – One Do-It-Yourself cable network show blew up a sand castle in a living room to show what it would do to air ducts. When they called in the experts to clean up the mess, they called in a company from Arvada.

Ductworks recently made an appearance on the “Disaster House” episode.

“Disaster House” is a Do-It-Yourself cable show that simulates storm and disaster damage to show homeowners how to prevent them in the first place, how to clean it up and what they need to know before filing an insurance claim.

During the sand castle episode, the host, contractor Josh Temple, blew up a 5,000-pound, six-foot tall sand castle in the living room of a home to demonstrate an extreme case of dirty air ducts.

“At first I thought it was a prank. I couldn’t believe what they were saying,” Eddy Frisk of Ductworks said about getting the call from the producers.

Frisk says this was no ordinary job.

“Typically we’ll pull anywhere between 30 to 50 pounds of debris out of a standard house but in this house there were literally hundreds of pounds of debris inside the ventilation system. I think this is the hardest job that any air duct cleaning company has ever had,” he said.

Frisk says it took his crews all day but they finally cleaned out the ducts.

“We just took more time. We went through the ductworks, the furnace and the air conditioning system and just took our time and did it right,” he said.

But the hard work is paying off for the Arvada company.

“It was a great experience. It was an extremely hard job but we have a lot of fun and it’s definitely been good for business. We’ve been getting a lot of calls for business,” Frisk said.

Ductworks has been in business since 1990 and employs 30 people.

The episode premiered on Jan. 1 but is repeating on the Do-It-Yourself cable network. Check your local listings for times.
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